Q. Can I use Wikipedia in a college paper?

Answer

It depends how you use Wikipedia. Don't cite it in your paper, but it can help you discover independent sources for the facts and ideas in the article.

A word of warning: your instructors may have strong opinions about Wikipedia, so check with them first! Your grade may be at stake.

Citing Wikipedia as a source is usually a bad idea.

Why?

Academic writing emphasizes sources that are close to the events or phenomena being discussed. This means using primary sources, such as original scientific research, actual laws, eyewitness testimony, etc., or sophisticated secondary sources, written by experts who have reviewed the primary sources.  Encyclopedias, such as Wikipedia, only summarize the findings of secondary sources. They are not close to the things being studied. Because of this, it is best to start with encyclopedias for helpful overviews, but then to seek more original sources to base your paper on.

Furthermore, Wikipedia articles can be written or revised by anyone at any time. You can't know anything about the expertise, bias, or motivations of the many authors contributing to an article. Because of this, you can't evaluate its reliability. Finally, Wikipedia is at risk for the spread of biased information by anonymous authors.

Wikipedia can help you find relevant external sources

One  important benefit of Wikipedia is that many articles cite the sources for their claims. These sources are separate from Wikipedia. Often you can link to the external sources and evaluate them yourself. If the source is good, then you can rely upon it for your paper. Don't cite Wikipedia, but let it point you to promising sources.

How to use Wikipedia's citations

  • Citations are marked with superscript numbers. The citations come immediately after the borrowed material. You can "mouse over" the number for a quick citation, or you can click it to see the list of citations at the bottom. 
  • Here is an example from a Wikipedia article on dogs. 

Humans would also have derived enormous benefit from the dogs associated with their camps.[138]

If you want more detail on this claim for your paper . . .

"mouse over" the superscript [138]. It gives this citation:

Tacon, Paul; Pardoe, Colin (2002). "Dogs make us human". Nature Australia27 (4): 52–61.

  • Many citations include links, but not this one. If you want to find the source, contact a librarian on LibChat, or sometimes you can find an article by copying its citation into Google Scholar.

 

  • Last Updated Jun 17, 2020
  • Views 56
  • Answered By Joe Brewer

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